Cultura Pobre

floppyhump:

invocationwithin:

loosetoon:

Early 70’s behind the scenes of Sesame Street with the Muppets.

THIS IS THE BEST PHOTO SET I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED. 

Love!

Ouch!

Maria Hill por Michael Walsh em Secret Avengers Vol3. #01.

comicartistevolution:

They say the new Thor is someone he rescued once.
Is Adventures in Babysitting canon?

comicartistevolution:

They say the new Thor is someone he rescued once.

Is Adventures in Babysitting canon?

westcoastavengers:

Marvel 75th Anniversary Covers by Alex Ross

seanhowe:

So Who Exactly Are the Guardians of the Galaxy?

Glad you asked.

In 2004, Marvel was in the midst of a giant crossover event titled Civil War, and while everyone was distracted with that, a handful of restless creators began to carve out their own corner of the comic publisher’s universe. “A lot of these characters were sort of laying around,” says one former member of the editorial team involved in their resuscitation. “We thought, ‘No one really seems to have a great deal of affection for them, so maybe we can push the Marvel science-fiction universe a little further.’” Whereas a story that involved A-listers like Wolverine or Spider-Man required bureaucratic hurdles, Groot and Rocket Raccoon guaranteed creative leeway. Their efforts culminated a couple of years later, when the characters landed their own big crossover event, called “Annihilation.” It was a breakout hit, and by 2008, the team was formally gathered as the Guardians of the Galaxy. (Even that name was something of a leftover, having once belonged to an earlier abandoned group.)

Keith Giffen, who co-created Rocket Raccoon in the seventies and then helped reintroduce him in the aughts, says the tone of the comic is a natural match for Hollywood. “It’s the lighthearted, fun, quip-filled, bouncy stuff that fits in pretty well with all the stuff they’re already doing, and going out into space will be a nice change of setting.” And although it would seem a safer bet for Marvel to exploit slightly more established characters—Doctor Strange, say, or Black Panther, or even Iron Fist—the lack of expectation that liberated the creators of the Guardians of the Galaxy comic book may be a similar boon for the filmmakers. “Everyone has a firm idea of who and what Spider-Man is,” says the ex-staffer. “If you stray too far from that, people will say, ‘That’s not the Spider-Man that I know,’ and they’re disappointed. Whereas if you throw a bunch of characters like Drax on a movie screen, there are relatively few people who have some idea in their head.”

And it’s easy to see why. Simply put, these characters are weird. Here’s a quick Guardians guide.

Groot
In the late fifties, Marvel Comics had fallen on hard times and laid off nearly its entire staff. In the months before 1961’s The Fantastic Four marked the rebirth of the Marvel superhero, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby turned out a parade of bizarre aliens and monsters that menaced American cities, with names like Monstrom, Krang, and Droom. And then there was Groot, the Monarch of Planet X, a walking and talking tree that consumed fences, cabinets, and barrels. Or, as one member of the panicking populace exclaimed, “A creature of wood, who feeds on wood!” He was primed to become the overlord of all the timber in the galaxy, had a shrewd scientist not thought to breed termites and let them loose on the barky beast. Over the next 45 years, Groot appeared exactly twice.

Drax the Destroyer
After the evil alien Thanos — a.k.a. “The Mad Titan,” a death-obsessed, craggy-faced bruiser from one of Saturn’s moons — thought that pipe-smoking, saxophone-playing real-estate agent Arthur Douglas had blown his cover, he aimed a death blast at Douglas’s car, killing him and his wife. Shortly thereafter, Thanos’s estranged father merged Douglas’s spirit with a bunch of earthen rubble to create the green, caped, and very powerful Drax the Destroyer, whose all-consuming mission was to destroy Thanos. Writer-artist Jim Starlin introduced Drax in the pages of Iron Man in 1973; within a month, Stan Lee had him removed from the title. In 1982, Marvel’s editor-in-chief Jim Shooter wrote an issue of The Avengers in which Drax was killed. He remained dead for the rest of the decade, until Starlin revived him in the early nineties. Giffen, who dusted Drax off again in 2004, says that although he increased the character’s intelligence, he remains “too macho for the room,” noting, “I just turned him from a green imbecile into a green douchebag.”

Gamora
After Jim Starlin was booted from his Iron Man gig, he continued to chronicle the dastardly actions of Thanos in both Captain Marvel and Warlock. By this time, Starlin was having problems with editorial constrictions, and the 1975story in which the alien assassin Gamora debuted was, in part, a metaphor about Marvel Comics as a purveyor of conveyer-belt junk. Green-skinned and decked out in a fishnet unitard cut down to the navel, Gamora wielded a dagger and called herself “the Deadliest Woman in the Whole Galaxy,” but when she tried to slay her adoptive father Thanos, he killed her instead. She was out of the picture for nearly a decade and a half, until — as he had done for Drax — Starlin raised her from the dead.

Star-Lord
Test pilot Hal Jordan became the Green Lantern when a dying alien bestowed a powerful ring upon him. Astronaut Peter Quill, on the other hand, achieved the Star-Lord power a little more dishonestly — by taking out his compatriots with a rifle, hijacking a rocketship, and flying off to visit the godlike Master of the Sun. Steve Englehart, who created the character in 1976, intended to write a series of adventures for the hero — a love story on Venus, for instance, and a war story on Mercury. “I deliberately made him a complete asshole,” Englehart says, “with the idea that I was going to write twelve stories about him as he worked his way through the galaxy, and by the end of it he would have become this great hero.” But Englehart, citing editorial interference, quit Marvel Comics soon after the first issue was published. X-Men writer Chris Claremont experimented with a less prickly version of the character before abandoning it completely in 1981, and 23 years passed before he was revived again. However, the character’s very name still carries the seeds of Englehart’s sharp humor. “Peter Quill — Peter as a reference to a dick, and Quill as a reference to a dick,” he explains. “I wanted him to be completely unlikable.”

Rocket Racoon
Originally named Rocky Raccoon, this gun-toting alien from “somewhere near the black holes of Sirius Major” debuted in a 1976 short story by Bill Mantlo and Keith Giffen in the back of Marvel Preview, a black-and-white magazine-size comic. The legal department was skittish about the prospects of a character named after a Beatles song, so five years later, when he finally returned for a guest appearance in The Incredible Hulk, he was given the sobriquet Rocket Raccoon. Writer Bill Mantlo received considerable amounts of hate mail for that issue (“Are you all regressing to your childhoods?” wrote five enraged University of Maine students), but in the wake of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles phenomenon in 1984, a four-issue Rocket Raccoon miniseries was green-lit. It was hardly a best seller; the character popped up exactly four times over the next two decades.

This appeared in different form on New York magazine’s Vulture blog in 2012. Marvel Comics: The Untold Story is on sale now.

dustinweaver:

snubpollard:

Tetsuwan Atom and his ass bullets vs. the United States Armed Forces in Vietnam, from a charged moment in global history - as serialized in a Japanese daily newspaper.

(Astro Boy, Osamu Tezuka, c. 1967)

Yes Yes Yes

I really love the whole “Once Upon A Time” Astro Boy story line. This is a stand out moment.

Recommended.

sixpenceee:

If you rub your closed eyes, you’ll “see” a virtual rainbow of colors, shapes, squiggles, and lines. Those are called phosphenes, and the eye and the brain work together to create these weird little visual blips.

Phosphenes occur when there is no external visual stimulus. That can happen when you close your eyes or when you’re focused on scenery with little to no input as to depth or changes, such as a dark highway at night.

People who spend long periods of time in sensory deprivation or meditation often report seeing visions, which can be chalked up to the appearance of phosphenes.

The presence of physical stimulus to the eye, like pushing on the eyeball, will create temporary phosphenes, and more traumatic events like head injuries can create permanent squiggles.

 In these cases, phosphenes are present because the visual centers of the brain are active without the presence of external visual stimuli.

For example, when conscious patients undergoing brain surgery had different areas of their brains electrically stimulated, they reported seeing phosophenes.

In studies of blind people, it’s been found that the appearance of phosphenes happens in different areas along the sight pathway between the eye and the brain, depending on what part of the visual system has been damaged.

Humans aren’t the only ones who can see these dancing bits of light and color—the phenomenon has been observed in animals as well.

SOURCE

iaintnobodyswhore:

”(…)Through artist’s metaphorical use of materials — stones and clay, mostly — the works at Rockaway! conjure a theme of hope and renewal. Perhaps she summed up the ideas for the show best. As Patti gave a tour of her work, she handed out a rock from her piece Font, a tub filled with small, white stones intended to be taken by patrons during their visit. “Take one for the rebuilding,” she said in her trademark cool, convincing tone. “Its with stones that we rebuild.”
Patti with her work, Font

iaintnobodyswhore:

”(…)Through artist’s metaphorical use of materials — stones and clay, mostly — the works at Rockaway! conjure a theme of hope and renewal. Perhaps she summed up the ideas for the show best. As Patti gave a tour of her work, she handed out a rock from her piece Font, a tub filled with small, white stones intended to be taken by patrons during their visit. “Take one for the rebuilding,” she said in her trademark cool, convincing tone. “Its with stones that we rebuild.”

Patti with her work, Font

iaintnobodyswhore:

ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NY - June 22, 2014 - Patti photographed inside building T9 in Fort Tilden
by Jacob Blickenstaff

iaintnobodyswhore:

ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NY - June 22, 2014 - Patti photographed inside building T9 in Fort Tilden

by Jacob Blickenstaff

cinephiliabeyond:

Horror by definition is the emotion of pure revulsion. Terror of the same standard, is that of fearful anticipation. Horror is like a serpent; always shedding its skin, always changing. And it will always come back. It can’t be hidden away like the guilty secrets we try to keep in our subconscious.  The masterclass of the director, Dario Argento, was held in the University of Iceland on the 4th of October 2012 for the Reykjavik International Film Festival. He talked about his art and answered questions from the audience.

Italian filmmaker Dario Argento has gained a well-deserved reputation among horror film buffs as one of the most distinctive and original directors working in the genre, creating visually stylized and emotionally complex nightmares filled with blood and menace. Dario Argento: An Eye For Horror (1997) is a documentary on the filmmaker’s career that looks at his work of the past (and his relationship with former girlfriend Daria Nicolodi and daughter Asia Argento, both of whom are actresses who have appeared in several of his films) as well as his future as he works on his 2001 release Non Ho Sonno. —Mark Deming, Rovi

During the 1960s and 1970s, European low-budget films went kinky, emerging as a new type of cinema that blended eroticism, surrealism, horror, and over-the-top atmospherics. During the 1960s and 1970s, European low-budget films went kinky, emerging as a new type of cinema that blended eroticism, surrealism, horror, and over-the-top atmospherics. Eurotika!  (1999–) covers European exploitation cinema and sexploitation before the introduction of home video. Episode Blood and Black Lace: A Short History of the Italian Horror Film  focuses on Italian horror filmmakers Mario Bava, Dario Argento, and Lucio Fulci, whose baroque and bloody horror thrillers were also slick and stylish. The program features interviews with Erika Blanc, Orchidea de Santis, Daniela Giordano, Luigi Cozzi and Al Festa.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

brianmichaelbendis:

The truth has been revealed: Katy Perry is a copy of a 50s’ comic book character called “Katy Keene”

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Cavaleiro da Lua em dois tempos.

Esquerda: por Bill Sienkiewicz em Moon Knight #28 (1982)

Direita: por Declan Shalvey em Moon Knight #03 (2014)

brianmichaelbendis:

Frank Frazetta, 1966.
Original art for the back cover of Mad #106.

brianmichaelbendis:

Frank Frazetta, 1966.

Original art for the back cover of Mad #106.

A polêmica vazia dessa semana nos quadrinhos foi o affair entre o Falcão e Jet, a filha novinha do Armin Zola lá da Dimensão Z que rolou em Captão América #22.
Mas o que me chamou atenção mesmo foi a coleção de vinil de responsa que tem na Torre dos Vingadores. No fundo na cena, álbuns “Cositas Buenas”de Paco De Lucia e “Friday Night in San Francisco” do guitar trio formado por De Lucia, John McLaughlin e Al Dimeola.

A polêmica vazia dessa semana nos quadrinhos foi o affair entre o Falcão e Jet, a filha novinha do Armin Zola lá da Dimensão Z que rolou em Captão América #22.

Mas o que me chamou atenção mesmo foi a coleção de vinil de responsa que tem na Torre dos Vingadores. No fundo na cena, álbuns “Cositas Buenas”de Paco De Lucia e “Friday Night in San Francisco” do guitar trio formado por De Lucia, John McLaughlin e Al Dimeola.

superseventies:

Debbie Harry and David Bowie

superseventies:

Debbie Harry and David Bowie